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The mean gravelly soils and invigorating climes of Mount Barker of the Australian southwest, were identified during the 1960s by the world's leading viticulturalists, as a place uncannily similar to the great terroirs and clime of Bordeaux. The pioneering vines of Forest Hill were the first ever planted here, sired from rootstock of ancient Houghton clones, inaugurally vintaged by the illustrious Jack Mann in 1972. The Cabernet and Riesling of Forest Hill were promptly distinguished by multiple trophy victories and praised by gentleman James Halliday as the most remarkable wines to come out of the Australian west. Forest Hill have remained a source of the most.. Softly spoken wonders from the west»
Excruciatingly low yields, a ruthless hand sorting of fruit, ferments in new oak barrels and twenty months maturation, Bowen Estate are one of Coonawarra's most prestigious marques, maintaining a standard of excellence which merits inclusion into the highly prestigious Langtons Classification of Australian Wine. Essential for every enthusiast of stellar quality Cabernet Sauvignon, brought within easy reach this week at the down to earth.. Excellent langtons classification of australian wine»
The very first blocks of vine planted at Scotchmans Hill, are now in their fourth decade. Set aside for bottling as a range of limited release, single vineyard wines, they represent the first growth of viticulture from the fertile crescent of Port Phillip's western shore. Crafted to traditional old world techniques, very similar to the great Crus of la Bourgogne, they afford the true enthusiast an opportunity to engage with the decadent delights of the greater Geelong, as sampled alongside Gruyere, game and the finest gourmandise... All the best from scotchmans hill»
Originally formulated by John Charles Brown OBE in 1954 and crafted to this very day in the exact same manner, Brown Brothers flagship icon endures as one of the nation's most distinguished single vineyard wines. Mondeuse plantings were brought to Australia in the early 1900s by the legendary Francois de Castella of St Hubert fame, they have remained the most precious parcel of Brown Brothers heirloom vines since the 1920s. At Milawa, Mondeuse translates into an inky, deeply tannic wine, it forms synergies with the sweet fruit plumpness of Shiraz and statuesque elegance of Cabernet Sauvignon to coalesce into a rich, opulent style of eloquence and structure... The brown brothers most closely guarded secret»

Kaesler Old Vine Shiraz CONFIRM VINTAGE

Shiraz Barossa South Australia
The Kaesler family arrived in South Australia as Silesian pioneers, migrating to Barossa Valley in the 1840s. Some of the original gnarled, dry grown Shiraz vines still remain and provide the backbone for the intense wines produced from the sandy loam soils of the estate's prime viticultural block. Old Vine Shiraz is an assembly of four parcels of old Shiraz vines grown to Kaesler vineyards. A Shiraz that will never be overtly fruity, it is best suited to those who prefer a solid, chewy wine with a savoury style and good solid structure.
Available in cases of 6
Case of 6
$479.50
The Kaeslers did not make their own wine until quite recently, traditionally selling grapes to Seppelt. Today's Kaesler springs from a worldwide search for a property to produce the best possible grapes for red wine. Shiraz is hand harvested during the chill of morning, off three distinguished vineyard blocks at Marananga and Nuriootpa, averaging fifty years of age. Fruit is treated to ten days of open ferment on skins and daily pumpovers twice daily. Batches are pressed into a selection of seasoned and new French oak hogsheads for twenty three months maturation, regular rackings and top ups, before assemblage and bottling without any fining or filtration, the emphasis on an extreme style of Shiraz.
Purple/ crimson colour, dense centre and youthful edge. A bouquet of dark plums and blackberry and toasty oak, creme de cassis and liquorice, the aromas are slightly introverted in its youth. The fruit is actually quite solid but repressed by oak and tannin at the moment. Full bodied and powerful, plenty of tannin and structure, elegant in style as dark berry fruits mingle on a length of mocha and cassis notes.
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Kaesler - a century of tradition based around the Old Vines, nurtured and handled by some of the most caring hands in the Barossa

The Kaesler Vineyards were established in 1893. The family, sprung from Silesian pioneers who came to the Barossa Valley in the 1840s, took up 96 acres in 1891. They cleared the scrub and in 1893 planted out the entire holding with Shiraz, Grenache, Mataro (Mourvedre) and White Hermitage vines.

Kaesler

Some of the gnarled dry-grown Shiraz vines still remain and provide the backbone for the intense wines produced from the sandy loams of this prime viticultural block. In the early sixties, Arthur Kaesler saw no future in dried fruit, and pulled out the fruit trees to replace them with vines, mostly Shiraz and Grenache, still mainly for port. He also planted Mataro, just to have something different, Clare Riesling (Crouchen) and some Semillon.

The Kaeslers did not make their own wine. Traditionally, they sold their grapes to the Seppelts. The exceptional Kaesler wines now being produced had their beginning in 1997 when a young winemaker at Cellarmaster just a few hundred metres away at Dorrien noticed the power and intensity of the fruit. The old vine material was there. Led by 3.7 acres of 1893 Shiraz, more than 70% of the red vines in the vicinity of the vineyard were 40 or more years old. The Shiraz thrived on the sandy loam over clay. The Grenache was on the rockier patches, restricting the crop from this prolific producer.

Today's Kaesler Wines springs from a worldwide search for a property to produce the best possible grapes for red wine. Winemaker Reid Bosward and his co-owners, a group of international wine lovers, searched areas such as the Napa Valley, the south of France, Marlborough, and other parts of Australia before deciding on the Barossa. "No other area can produce the intensity of flavor that we have in the Barossa," says Reid.

Kaesler

The first site that the winelovers acquired comprised 26.3 acres of vines, eight acres of Shiraz, 5-1/2 acres of Grenache, 2-1/2 acres of Mataro, eight acres of Semillon and just over two acres of Cabernet Sauvignon. The inaugural 2000 vintage was difficult throughout the valley. Kaesler made a crush of 19.6 tonnes off the twenty six acres, but it was good stuff. In 2001, they added the crop from the newly acquired neighbouring 28.5 acres, six acres of Shiraz, eight acres of Grenache, six of Semillon, some Riesling, and some fresh plantings of Voignier. This was a variety that Reid had experience with in France as a straight white wine, and as a fascinating blend with Shiraz. The first major decision was to intensify the fruit even further. Growers who send their fruit to outside wineries may tend to keep their tonnages up. Growers who make their own wine can opt to restrict the output to increase the quality. By pruning responsibly and reducing water, Reid has already cut the yield on red wine grapes by nearly 40%. The result is density and exquisite flavour. Baume, the measure of sugar content, is high - allowing wine to be made with up to 15% alcohol.

Why make such powerful wines? "Because we can," Reid explains. "Lean wines are for a lean area. The Barossa allows us to have a high intensity of flavour. Most other places can't do this."

It is part of the partners determination to make great wine and to develop a style that offers a choice. Kaesler is built on providing a difference. The partners do not plan to take Kaesler up to 300,000 cases. The determination is to concentrate on producing excellent wine. The only thread that holds Kaesler together is the production of excellent wine.

Kaesler