• Delivery
Wine clubWine clubWine clubWine club
  • Gift registry
  • Wishlist
  • FAQs
Right across the road from Jasper Hill's Emily Paddock,a precious parcel of ancient terra rosa soil was acquired and planted to vine by a baronial Mornington estate, highly accomplished growers with a consuming aspiration to grow the finest Shirazin all Heathcote. They settled on a coveted site along Drummond's Lane, strewn with unique green Cambrian shards, a sacred place to yield the top growth amongst single vineyardHeathcote Shiraz. Decades later, the vintages remain excruciatingly measured in availability. Painstakingly hand made, arcanely labelled behind the monikers, Pressings, Block F and Block C, the cherished editions of Heathcote Estate represent.. The likely lads of drummond's lane»
Marlborough viticulture owes much to the import of emigres from war torn Europe. Many were skilled fruit growers while others were passionate winemakers. They quickly discovered the magical affinity between aromatic white varietals and the mistral valleys of Te Wai Pounamu... Match a meal with maria»
Airline pilots make surprisingly good wine. Their appreciation of the sciences, a respect for the weather and a bird's eye view of the land, all invaluable to the winemaker's art. John Ellis would take every opportune weekend away from his regular New York Paris route, to pursue a passion for viticulture. He planted the first commercial Cabernet Merlot vines in the Hamptons and found time between trans atlantic flights to work vintages amongst the Grand Cru vineyards of La Bourgogne. Ellis ultimately made the great lifelong sea change in favour of our land downunder. He settled on a farmstead outside Leongatha, amongst the slow ripening pastures of Gippsland.. Placing pinot amongst the pastures»
A living legend and bespoke savant of the Australian wine industry, Geoff Merrill began his career in 1973 at Seppelt & Son, before completing tours of duty at Thomas Hardy and Chateau Reynella. Geoff acquired the historic Reynella wineworks in 1985 and has continued to craft many of McLaren Vale's most memorable vintages ever since. Mr Merrill has claimed countless industry accolades and many of our nation's most prestigious awards, including the hotly contested VISY Great Shiraz Challenge and the illustrious Jimmy Watson Trophy. Merrill offers a range of artisanal, limited release wines, of timely age, extravagant oak and sound value... The advanced age & luxury oak of mclaren vale's quiet achiever»

Voyager Estate Shiraz CONFIRM VINTAGE

Shiraz Margaret River Western Australia
A continuation of the evolution in Shiraz from Voyager Estate and Margaret River. The idyllic growing conditions and low yields make for an invigorating wine of sound structure and luscious mid palate sweetness. The flavours in the grapes are tremendous, blueberries and blood plum, dark cherries and exotic trade spice. The restorative Margaret River Indian summers stimulate vines to achieve a harvest of intensely ripened, piquantly fragrant fruit. A vibrant wine of complexity and purity of fruit, retaining the finesse and elegance which are hallmarks of all things Voyager Estate.
Available in cartons of six
Case of 6
$221.50
Voyager's seven Shiraz blocks comprise five different clones, planted to some of the toughest, shallow, gravelly soils which reduce the inherent vigour of this variety. With the cooling sea breezes off the Indian Ocean and intensive viticultural management, including crop thinning and green thinning, the vines are sensitively managed to produce Shiraz grapes with impressive fruit characters. Small batch fermentation and gentle winemaking techniques are employed to ensure the fruit aromatics are respected, that the fine tannins are preserved and intense colour is extracted from the grapes. The final wine is treated to a year's maturation in a selection of French and American oak barrels.
Dark crimson with vibrant purple hues. Lifted aromas of black and blueberries, creme brulee and dried flowers over hints of dusty vanillin oak. A long and balanced mouthfeel with fantastic rich black fruits on the middle palate. Gravelly earthy notes, hints of spice and anise intertwine with sweet vanillin, black olives and cedary oak, all complemented by soft powdery tannins.
Voyager Estate
1 - 12 of 22
1 2 next»
1 - 12 of 22
1 2 next»
Voyager Estate
Voyager Estate is located in the premium wine producing region of Margaret River

Voyager Estate began life as Freycinet Estate, its first vines being planted in 1978. When it became Voyager Estate in 1991, the first move was to expand the original 44 hectares by buying three adjoining properties, bringing the total area to 300 hectares. Over the next few years a program of extensive modernization and improvement was undertaken. Taking pride of place is a magnificent cellar sales building, constructed in the enduring South African Cape Dutch style of architecture. The choice of this handsome and functional style of architecture reminds visitors that the first vines planted in Western Australia in 1829 were introduced from South Africa. The expansive gardens are now maturing and transforming Voyager Estate into a place of singular tranquility and beauty.

Voyager Estate

Voyager Estate's oldest vines date back to 1978, just over 10 years after vines were first planted in the area. When current owner Michael Wright took over the property in 1991, he set out to expand it and develop a visitor destination that would be a showcase for the region. He also set out to ensure that, above all else, the quality of wine being made at Voyager Estate would always be the best that nature, expertise and pure hard work could provide.

Voyager Estate owner, Michael Wright is a third generation member of a family business that started with his grandfather in 1900. Michael’s father, Peter Wright, played a major role in the discovery and promotion of WA’s substantial iron ore industry and was, along with Lang Hancock, a founding member of the Hancock & Wright group. While the family is best known for its mining involvement, it also enjoys interests in agricultural, transport and publishing to name a few.

In the opinion of Voyager Estate Viticulturist, Steve James "There are a number of differences in viticultural techniques around the world, but the basic vineyard principles common to the best producers were terroir, minimal intervention and vine management." Voyager Estate follows the same path, with a minimal or no-input policy in terms of fertiliser, water and chemicals, and are employing more and more organic practices. Maximum vine management in terms of canopy maintenance is employed, aiming for low bud numbers and small bunches per vine for premium fruit quality. Clonal selection is also an area of increased attention, trying to match the best clones to the soil.

Voyager Estate

Whilst there will always be experimentation with new technologies, experience in both the Old World and the New has shown that the deepest expression of the vineyard is reliant on the basics. Adapting the traditional vineyard philosophies of the ancient winemaking world, is at the very heart of what makes Voyager Estate the quality that it is. According to Winemaker, Cliff Royle, Voyager Estate’s winemaking philosophy is simply to make the best wines we possibly can. Traditional methods are applied and the latest technology is utilised.

The winemaking process, however, begins in the vineyard. To ensure the best possible wines are produced, the winemakers work very closely with the viticultural team during the ripening period and harvest. On the whole, the best wines come from minimal winemaking intervention and allowing the fruit to speak for itself. "We make wines from the classic grape varieties that are suited to the Margaret River region, and we put as much effort into making a lighter-style wine such as Sauvignon Blanc Semillon as we do our Chardonnay," Cliff says.

In Cliff’s view, it is essential to respect the varietal characteristics of the fruit and so, when it comes to the use of oak, he is very careful not to overdo it. "The best fruit in the world can be ruined by heavy-handed or uncomplimentary oak usage. Careful oak integration is so important – we want to enhance the fruit, not overpower or spoil it." There is one final key component to good winemaking – people. On this point, Cliff is quite clear: "Have good staff, train them well and look after them". And we agree with him. After all, he is Winestate Magazine’s 2002/03 Australian Winemaker of the Year

Voyager Estate