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Marlborough viticulture owes much to the import of emigres from war torn Europe. Many were skilled fruit growers while others were passionate winemakers. They quickly discovered the magical affinity between aromatic white varietals and the mistral valleys of Te Wai Pounamu... Match a meal with maria»
The First Colonists to arrive in South Australia were brought to Kangaroo Island aboard HMS Buffalo in 1836. Sharing the journey was a veteran of the Royal Navy who had served aboard Lord Nelson's flagship HMS Victory. Frank Potts was an accomplished sailor and carpenter, he built many of the young colony's structures and trading vessels. Six generations later, the Potts family's precious plantings of Malbec have been a key component in many of the nation's most memorable and invaluable vintages for decades. A varietal that performs magnificently on the silty flood plains of Langhorne Creek, Bleasdale's pure Malbec bottlings are a profound statement about the.. Making the most magnificent malbec»
There are few family names in the Australian wine industry as eminent and enduring as Glaetzer and Potts, they own and operate many of the oldest and most precious vineyards in Langhorne Creek. John Glaetzer was right hand man to the legendary Wolf Blass throughout the breathtaking sequence of Black Label Jimmy Watson victories. Ben Potts learned his trade at the oldest family owned wineworks in Australia Bleasdale, established by the larger than life Frank Potts in 1858. Ben's great grandfather was the first Langhorne Creek grower to supply grapes to Wolf Blass. The Glaetzer and Potts families have collaborated for decades to achieve many of the nation's.. Vital vintages from the most precious parcels»
A living legend and bespoke savant of the Australian wine industry, Geoff Merrill began his career in 1973 at Seppelt & Son, before completing tours of duty at Thomas Hardy and Chateau Reynella. Geoff acquired the historic Reynella wineworks in 1985 and has continued to craft many of McLaren Vale's most memorable vintages ever since. Mr Merrill has claimed countless industry accolades and many of our nation's most prestigious awards, including the hotly contested VISY Great Shiraz Challenge and the illustrious Jimmy Watson Trophy. Merrill offers a range of artisanal, limited release wines, of timely age, extravagant oak and sound value... The advanced age & luxury oak of mclaren vale's quiet achiever»

Henschke Johanns Garden Grenache Bush Vine Blend CONFIRM VINTAGE

Grenache Mourvedre Shiraz Barossa Eden South Australia
A tribute to the early Lutheran pioneers, many of whom carried Johann as their first name. Two thirds Grenache, with the balance of Mourvedre and Shiraz, all from low yielding, old and gnarled, dry farmed, bush grown and trellised Barossa vineyards. These precious sites yield parcels of parched but intensely flavoured fruit, in smaller berry and bunch size, exuding rare generosity and remarkable warmth. A richly concentrated palate, beautifully soft and textural, supported by fine grained tannins and a long, savoury finish.
Available in cartons of six
Case of 6
$359.50
Barossa growers habitually refer to their vineyard as the garden, their toil, perseverance and conservatism in hardship, has meant that the descendants who followed the forebears tradition, rejoiced in the quality of fruit from their meticulous efforts. The traditions and culture have survived to this day, including the old world winemaking techniques, handed down from generation to generation. The complex Cotes du Rhone blend, crafted from fruit picked off dry grown old bush vines, is just one of their enduring legacies. Grenache, Mourvedre and Shiraz are vinified separately, followed by maturation in older French oak hogheads for ten months prior to assemblage and bottling.
Deep garnet with violet hues. Exotic spicy plum and cherry aromas with complex notes of lavender, cardamom, sage and mace contribing enticing complexity. A ripe, fleshy palate packed with dark fruits, spices and herbs, textured and layered, velvety fine tannins and a long finish. A match to braised cheek, Pot au feu or red wine ragu.
Henschke
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Henschke
Henschke is one of the longest established family names in the Barossa

Johann Christian Henschke purchased land for a farm at Keyneton in 1861, after fleeing religious persecution in Silesia. He planted a small vineyard and an orchard, and after initially making wine for family consumption produced his first commercial vintage in 1868, believed to be principally riesling and shiraz. Each subsequent generation built upon the reputation for quality, but it was fourth-generation Cyril Alfred Henschke who in 1958 created the wine that has most captured the red wine world's imagination - Hill of Grace.

Henschke

The original two-storey cellar, built into the side of the hill in time for the 1868 vintage, has been added to throughout the generations. Now covered with ivy, the stone building retains an old-world charm with its open fermenters and winemaking memorabilia on display. The estate's Mount Edelstone, Hill of Grace, Eden Valley and Lenswood vineyards produce the range of Henschke wines. Managed by viticulturist Prue Henschke, the superlative vineyards bear the fruit of her leading edge research and development. They vary from venerable dry-grown shiraz vineyards to the newer cooler-climate Lenswood vineyards supporting varieties such as pinot noir, chardonnay and merlot.

The original two-storey cellar, built into the side of the hill in time for the 1868 vintage, has been added to throughout the generations. Now covered with ivy, the stone building retains an old-world charm with its open fermenters and winemaking memorabilia on display. The estate's Mount Edelstone, Hill of Grace, Eden Valley and Lenswood vineyards produce the range of Henschke wines. Managed by viticulturist Prue Henschke, the superlative vineyards bear the fruit of her leading edge research and development. They vary from venerable dry-grown shiraz vineyards to the newer cooler-climate Lenswood vineyards supporting varieties such as pinot noir, chardonnay and merlot.

In 1839 Johann Menge, a German geologist, mineralogist and gardener explored and surveyed the regions around Adelaide in the new free colony of South Australia, on behalf of George Fife Angas and Colonel William Light. He travelled through the Barossa Range, giving names to the rivers and hills, including Mount Edelstein, which with time was anglicised to Mount Edelstone. The 40-acre Eden Valley vineyard, was planted to shiraz, probably sourced from Joseph Gilbert at Pewsey Vale. The original pre-phylloxera material most likely originated from the James Busby selection, which was propagated by Samuel Smith of Yalumba in the 1850s. What is surprising about Mount Edelstone is that it was planted purely as a shiraz vineyard.

Henschke

Hill of Grace is surely is one of the most evocative phrases in the world of wine. For Henschke it is the name of both the vineyard and the wine that has so captured the heart of the red wine lover. The land was originally granted to Charles Flaxman in 1842 for £1 per acre. It was then sold by George Fife Angas to Nicolaus Stanitzki in 1873, for £480. Paul Gotthard Henschke purchased the vineyard in 1891. After his death his sons and executors Paul Alfred and Julius Philip Henschke arranged the transfer to Julius Philip, who had married into the Stanitzki family. In 1951 the property was purchased by Louis Edmund Henschke, a son of Paul Alfred Henschke, who worked the vineyard and property for nearly 40 years. The family continues to maintain the heritage.

The eight-hectare vineyard on the original 32-hectare block sits at an altitude of 400 metres, and has an average rainfall of 520 millimetres. It is situated on Parrot Hill, an isolated spot that was once an active village. Hill of Grace is planted predominantly to shiraz, but a surprise to many is that it also includes other varieties. Riesling, semillon and mataro/ mourvedre, with the sercial grape now only a distant memory. This diverse planting of several varieties in the garden, as the old Barossan growers called their vineyard, is typical - a sort of hedging their bets against the vagaries of mother nature. The whites are used in Eden Valley varietals, and the mataro...well, that's one of mother nature's later maturing varieties. It has gone into Hill of Grace at times, but usually it just doesn't ripen enough.

The Henschke Eden Valley Estate vineyard is located in the cooler part of the Mount Lofty Ranges, at an altitude of 500 metres and a rainfall of 700 millimetres. Cyril Henschke purchased the property from his son Kenneth Crossman Thyer in 1966, and established a large planting of predominantly riesling and shiraz at a time when riesling was scarce and bonuses were being paid by the large wineries. Today the riesling is the source of the Julius Eden Valley Riesling, named in honour of great-uncle Julius Henschke, a highly acclaimed artist and sculptor, while the shiraz is used in the Keyneton Estate Euphonium blend. This wine is named after the early English pioneer Joseph Keynes who settled at Keyneton in 1842 and after whom the village was named.

What sets Henschke wines apart, is the energy in the glass. There is no wine like Hill of Grace anywhere, and the Henschkes work at the top of their form, to infuse every bottle of each label with the unique energy from their historic vineyards. There are few wines in the world that can surpass Henschke.

Henschke