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Henry Best was a highly industrious merchant and butcher who serviced Ararat miners during the Victorian gold rush. He planted thirty hectares of vine along Concongella Creek in 1866 and constructed a commercial cellar wineworks which continue to process the most spectacular vintages until the present day. The heirloom plantings of Henry Best remain productive, as some of the most historically significant rootstock in the world. Home of the Jimmy Watson 2012 Trophy, Royal Sydney 2013 Australian Wine Of Year, James Halliday 2014 Wine of Year, Distinguished and Outstanding Langtons Classifications. Remarkable for a style that's all their own, chiselled, brooding.. Carn the concongella cabernet»
Airline pilots make surprisingly good wine. Their appreciation of the sciences, a respect for the weather and a bird's eye view of the land, all invaluable to the winemaker's art. John Ellis would take every opportune weekend away from his regular New York Paris route, to pursue a passion for viticulture. He planted the first commercial Cabernet Merlot vines in the Hamptons and found time between trans atlantic flights to work vintages amongst the Grand Cru vineyards of La Bourgogne. Ellis ultimately made the great lifelong sea change in favour of our land downunder. He settled on a farmstead outside Leongatha, amongst the slow ripening pastures of Gippsland.. Placing pinot amongst the pastures»
Old Richmond Gaol was one of Diemen Land's first prisons, built by the convicts themselves, of good old fashioned granite blocks, laboriously hauled in wooden hand carts and quarried from the ominously monikered Butchers Hill. Today, Butchers Hill is the site of the steepest sloping vineyard in Coal River Valley, invigorated by afternoon sea breezes and prevailing winds from the roaring forties, its highly auspicious, self mulching black Vertosols, yield extraordinary wines. Established by founding members of the Hobart Beefsteak & Burgundy Club, Butchers Hill represents three generations of passion amongst the nether vineyards of the Apple Isle. Not just a.. Princely parcels of pooley»
Graeme Melton and a mate were travelling across South Australia in 1973, their EH Holden was in dire need of maintenance and Graeme took up casual work at a passing winery. The site supervisor was Peter Lehmann and young Graeme had his epiphany on the road to Barossa Valley. Lehmann suggested that Graeme change his name to Charlie and take the pilgrimmage to Vallee Rhone. Charlie became prepossessed with the culture of old vines Grenache, Shiraz and Mourverdre. He returned to the Barossa, at a time when old vineyard fruit was made into flagon Port and growers were destroying their historic sites in return for government grants. Charlie emabarked on a crusade.. Melton makes a mean mourvedre»

Henschke Abbotts Prayer Cabernet Merlot CONFIRM VINTAGE

Merlot Cabernet Sauvignon Adelaide Hills South Australia
An opulent accord of the most superior single vineyard Adelaide Hills Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon, picked off Stephen and Prue Henschke's exceptional site at Lenswood. This eminently distinguished vineyard was established among the historical homesteads along Coldstore Road by the first settler T N Mitchell in the late 1800s, these prestigious parcels are known to locals as Abbotts Flat. The property yields the most superlative quality Merlot to be found anywhere on the Adelaide Hills.
Available in cases of 6
Case of 6
$623.50
Lenswood was acquired in 1981 as the newest inclusion to the Henschke fold. Situated along Coldstore Road at 550 metres above sea level, just fifty kilometres from the ancient Mount Edelstone and Hill of Grace vineyards, the sloping aspects offer not only beautiful views towards the older vine country but also higher rainfall and humidity at the right time of the year, cooler temperatures to retain natural acidity, and still enough sunshine to fully ripen the grapes. The Abbotts Prayer label links together the history, winemaking traditions and local folklore of this mountainous region. Matured eighteen months in a combination of new and seasoned French oak hogsheads prior to assemblage.
Vivid deep crimson in colour. A sweet, spicy, complex nose of blueberries, mulberries, blood plums, cardamom and thyme with underlying hints of toasty French oak. The palate is beautifully svelte and complex with layers of flavour and fine-grained, silky tannins. Very textural, elegant and long.
Henschke
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Henschke
Henschke is one of the longest established family names in the Barossa

Johann Christian Henschke purchased land for a farm at Keyneton in 1861, after fleeing religious persecution in Silesia. He planted a small vineyard and an orchard, and after initially making wine for family consumption produced his first commercial vintage in 1868, believed to be principally riesling and shiraz. Each subsequent generation built upon the reputation for quality, but it was fourth-generation Cyril Alfred Henschke who in 1958 created the wine that has most captured the red wine world's imagination - Hill of Grace.

Henschke

The original two-storey cellar, built into the side of the hill in time for the 1868 vintage, has been added to throughout the generations. Now covered with ivy, the stone building retains an old-world charm with its open fermenters and winemaking memorabilia on display. The estate's Mount Edelstone, Hill of Grace, Eden Valley and Lenswood vineyards produce the range of Henschke wines. Managed by viticulturist Prue Henschke, the superlative vineyards bear the fruit of her leading edge research and development. They vary from venerable dry-grown shiraz vineyards to the newer cooler-climate Lenswood vineyards supporting varieties such as pinot noir, chardonnay and merlot.

The original two-storey cellar, built into the side of the hill in time for the 1868 vintage, has been added to throughout the generations. Now covered with ivy, the stone building retains an old-world charm with its open fermenters and winemaking memorabilia on display. The estate's Mount Edelstone, Hill of Grace, Eden Valley and Lenswood vineyards produce the range of Henschke wines. Managed by viticulturist Prue Henschke, the superlative vineyards bear the fruit of her leading edge research and development. They vary from venerable dry-grown shiraz vineyards to the newer cooler-climate Lenswood vineyards supporting varieties such as pinot noir, chardonnay and merlot.

In 1839 Johann Menge, a German geologist, mineralogist and gardener explored and surveyed the regions around Adelaide in the new free colony of South Australia, on behalf of George Fife Angas and Colonel William Light. He travelled through the Barossa Range, giving names to the rivers and hills, including Mount Edelstein, which with time was anglicised to Mount Edelstone. The 40-acre Eden Valley vineyard, was planted to shiraz, probably sourced from Joseph Gilbert at Pewsey Vale. The original pre-phylloxera material most likely originated from the James Busby selection, which was propagated by Samuel Smith of Yalumba in the 1850s. What is surprising about Mount Edelstone is that it was planted purely as a shiraz vineyard.

Henschke

Hill of Grace is surely is one of the most evocative phrases in the world of wine. For Henschke it is the name of both the vineyard and the wine that has so captured the heart of the red wine lover. The land was originally granted to Charles Flaxman in 1842 for £1 per acre. It was then sold by George Fife Angas to Nicolaus Stanitzki in 1873, for £480. Paul Gotthard Henschke purchased the vineyard in 1891. After his death his sons and executors Paul Alfred and Julius Philip Henschke arranged the transfer to Julius Philip, who had married into the Stanitzki family. In 1951 the property was purchased by Louis Edmund Henschke, a son of Paul Alfred Henschke, who worked the vineyard and property for nearly 40 years. The family continues to maintain the heritage.

The eight-hectare vineyard on the original 32-hectare block sits at an altitude of 400 metres, and has an average rainfall of 520 millimetres. It is situated on Parrot Hill, an isolated spot that was once an active village. Hill of Grace is planted predominantly to shiraz, but a surprise to many is that it also includes other varieties. Riesling, semillon and mataro/ mourvedre, with the sercial grape now only a distant memory. This diverse planting of several varieties in the garden, as the old Barossan growers called their vineyard, is typical - a sort of hedging their bets against the vagaries of mother nature. The whites are used in Eden Valley varietals, and the mataro...well, that's one of mother nature's later maturing varieties. It has gone into Hill of Grace at times, but usually it just doesn't ripen enough.

The Henschke Eden Valley Estate vineyard is located in the cooler part of the Mount Lofty Ranges, at an altitude of 500 metres and a rainfall of 700 millimetres. Cyril Henschke purchased the property from his son Kenneth Crossman Thyer in 1966, and established a large planting of predominantly riesling and shiraz at a time when riesling was scarce and bonuses were being paid by the large wineries. Today the riesling is the source of the Julius Eden Valley Riesling, named in honour of great-uncle Julius Henschke, a highly acclaimed artist and sculptor, while the shiraz is used in the Keyneton Estate Euphonium blend. This wine is named after the early English pioneer Joseph Keynes who settled at Keyneton in 1842 and after whom the village was named.

What sets Henschke wines apart, is the energy in the glass. There is no wine like Hill of Grace anywhere, and the Henschkes work at the top of their form, to infuse every bottle of each label with the unique energy from their historic vineyards. There are few wines in the world that can surpass Henschke.

Henschke