• Delivery
Wine clubWine clubWine clubWine club
  • Gift registry
  • Wishlist
  • FAQs
Jane Mitchell is one of Clare Valley's leading wine industry identities, Clare Valley Legend and Clare Valley Winemakers Hall of Fame, Centenary Federation of Australia Medal, SA Tourism Commission, Australian Regional Winemakers Forum, Wine Federation of Australia Council and Australian Wine and Brandy Corporation Board. Mitchell's largest vineyard is at Watervale, a very bleak place in the middle of winter at pruning time. It is known by the vineyard workers as Alcatraz, a place to do penance in the cold, wind and rain of a Clare Valley winter. Alcatraz only ever yields minimal harvests, source of the most memorable vintages in our nation's.. These old clare valley vines are just getting better»
Great wines from the Great Southern, the nether southwest rump of the continent, which yields the most astonishing quality vintages, both red and white. Castelli are a family of renewable power engineers, who are at their happiest picking grapes off vines. Boutique and very hands on, their efforts have been rewarded by prestigious international accolades, including Royal Perth Trophy for Best Chardonnay, San Francisco and International Wine Challenge Gold for Cabernet Sauvignon, Sydney Blue Gold for Shiraz. Defined by weighty palates, edifying complexity and statuesque grace, the entire range of Castelli represent an inspiring opportunity for immersion into.. Wonderfully winsome whiffs from the west»
Jim Barry was a pioneer of the Australian wine industry, the first academically qualified winemaker to take up Clare Valley viticulture in 1949. He had an uncanny intuition for good land and established some of the most illustrious vineyards on the continent. Jim Barry is also a patriarch of the Coonawarra, in pursuit of the perfect terroir for Cabernet Sauvignon, he planted vines on the ancient Penola Cricket Oval, preserving the original pavilion for posterity. Jim Barry endures as one of the nation's most distinguished brands, renowned throughout the world of wine for decades of the most remarkable vintages, an evolving range of superior vineyard editions,.. Salient statements from superior sites»
Graeme Melton and a mate were travelling across South Australia in 1973, their EH Holden was in dire need of maintenance and Graeme took up casual work at a passing winery. The site supervisor was Peter Lehmann and young Graeme had his epiphany on the road to Barossa Valley. Lehmann suggested that Graeme change his name to Charlie and take the pilgrimmage to Vallee Rhone. Charlie became prepossessed with the culture of old vines Grenache, Shiraz and Mourverdre. He returned to the Barossa, at a time when old vineyard fruit was made into flagon Port and growers were destroying their historic sites in return for government grants. Charlie emabarked on a crusade.. Melton makes a mean mourvedre»

Bleasdale Sparkling Shiraz CONFIRM VINTAGE

Shiraz Langhorne Creek South Australia
What's any special occasion without Bleasdale? Effusive and generous, Bleasdale's effervescent red gives so much more. A richly flavoured sparkler, the poly vintage Bleasdale is assembled from barrels of maturing Shiraz across several years, topped up with liqueur de tirage and treated to a secondary ferment in own bottle. An evocative palate and nose, fruits steeped in liqueur, mint and ribena, supported by a length of luscious coconut/ carob oak and toothsome, cherry ripe tannins.
Available in cartons of six
Case of 6
$155.50
The historic Bleasdale cellars, constructed from eucalyptus beams and limestone blocks, house a massive red gum lever press, which fifth generation winemaker Michael Potts still uses once a year to make a very limited release wine. While the Bleasdale wineworks are steeped in tradition and local folklore, the estate has installed the latest technology, still maintaining the founding philosophy of producing honest, consistent and reliable wines. From time to time, the Bleasdale team draw on stocks of maturing wines with the requisite qualities to construct a luscious Sparkling Shiraz. The complete course of methode traditionelle is followed by a term of bottle age beneath the Bleasdale cellars.
Dark purple red, a persistent mousse. Complex cherry liqueur perfume, maraschino and chocolate torte, rancio, cocoa oak and pepper notes. Rich bramble berries on the highly textural palate, red fruits, cherries and vibrantly spiced plum, chocolatety oak and supple tannins lead to a long, memorable finish. A suoerb aperitif wine, easily matched with seasoned kebabs, duckling and pork or chocolate desserts.
Bleasdale
1 - 12 of 22
1 2 next»
1 - 12 of 22
1 2 next»
Bleasdale
Bleasdale is Australia's second oldest, still functioning family owned winery. Bleasdale's wines are the stuff of legend and receive accolades around the world every year

Established in 1850 by English migrant Frank Potts, the Bleasdale vineyards are situated on the fertile flood plains of the Bremer River which run parallel to Langhorne Creek. The area is a low rainfall, cool climate region which produces outstanding wines year after year. Ironically, it was Frank Potts abilities as a sailor that led him to Langhorne Creek to live the life of a landlubber. He saw the potential of the region when he explored it in the 1850s, convinced that the stands of tall red gums promised fertile soils and reliable water. Being a nautical man, it's not surprising that Frank Potts chose to plant a vineyard in a place that for a week or two occasionally becomes an inland sea. He planted his first vines in 1858 selling wine to Thomas Hardy, before expanding his holdings to 30 acres in the 1860s. Since Pott's founding efforts, Langhorne Creek's alluvial soils and favourably cool climate, nurtured by maritime breezes, has attracted many famous winemakers.

Bleasdale

Langhorne Creek experiences natural floods from the high rainfall that gushes out of the Adelaide Hills and heads towards the sea from time to time. It occurred to Frank that with the addition of floodgates across the river he could control the water for a short period and give his vines a deep soaking drink just before the parching Australian summer. Langhorne Creek receives an average annual rainfall of just 380mm per year and flood events provide enough moisture in the rich deep soil profile of the flood plain to carry vines in these areas through the dry summer months. The majority of the vast vineyard plantings use modern and efficient drip and sub-surface irrigation practices to maintain the water needs of the vines.

Bleasdale is today still owned and operated by the Potts family, the fifth generation of winemakers. They lead a dedicated winemaking and cellar team who are very proud of their work. When you've been around for six generations of winemaking you accumulate innate viticultural skills and an affinity to the environment. Access to water, coupled with cooling breezes from Lake Alexandrina reduce evening temperatures and provide mild even growing seasons, making Langhorne Creek the ideal wine growing region. Despite this, much of the Langhorne Creek's fruit went into multi-regional blends and wasn't acknowledged until the 1990s when a small group of long term family growers, including Bleasdale, started promoting pure Langhorne Creek wines.

Traditionally a red wine grape region best known for full bodied Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet blends, as well as elegant Shiraz, the region also produces exceptional white and fortified wines. Langhorne Creek is now the centre of a vibrant grape growing and winemaking community which regularly wins national and international awards.

Bleasdale

The historic Bleasdale cellars, constructed from red gum and limestone, have been classified by the National Trust and are listed on the State and National Heritage Registers. The ancient winery houses a massive red gum lever press which fifth generation winemaker, Michael Potts still uses once a year to make a small batch, limited release wine.

Whilst Bleasdale is steeped in yesterday's history it has been outfitted with the latest technology. Today's winery still abides by the family traditions, retaining the philosophy of producing honest, consistent and reliable wines. Watch for the cobwebs as you clamber down the old redgum ladder into the bowels of Bleasdale winery. Duck your head and enter the old domed cellar built in 1892 and gaze around the walls at French and American oak puncheons, hogsheads and barriques, brim full of Cabernet and Shiraz. They are all destined for Bleasdale's super premium Frank Potts and Generations flagships, but that's years away. For now each parcel of each variety is matured separately, with up to 200 different wines all expressing their own individuality based on microclimate and soil.

Wander on to the redgum tasting bench where in September every year you'll find the team murmuring as they taste and spit wine samples. This exhaustive three day examination of every parcel, aided by two independent judges, will create the script for each final blend to be assembled. The outcome is not just about art and romance. Local growers wait anxiously for this time of the year when they know how their fruit will be graded and whether they receive a bonus for quality, rather than tonnes produced. It's the way it should be, in the pursuit of quality.

Bleasdale