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Beechworth attracts the most artisanal winemakers, the region's rich mineral soils and parched, undulating terrains, breed wines of vigorous flavour, crystalline textures and boney savoury tannins. The first parcel of Crown Land in the region was acquired by Isaac Phillips in 1857, he christened his estate Golden Ball and built a hotel named Honeymooners Inn, servicing miners on their way up the steep trails to the Beechworth goldfields. The old pub remains but the surrounding land has been turned over to viticulture, planted to vine in the nineteen naughties, it produces a quality of wine that's reserved for the nation's most exclusive winelists. Served by.. Small batches of beechworth's best»
Samuel Smith migrated from Dorset England to Angaston in the colony of South Australia circa 1847, he took up work as a gardener with George Fife Angas, the virtual founder of the colony. In 1849, Smith bought thirty acres and planted vines by moonlight, the first ever vintages of Yalumba. One of his most enduring legacies were some unique clones of Shiraz, which were ultimately sown to the illustrious Mount Edelstone vineyard in 1912. Angas's great grandchild Ron Angas acquired cuttings from the Edelstone site and migrated the precious plantings to his pastures at Hutton Vale. The land remains in family hands, a graze for flocks of some highly fortunate.. The return of rootstock to garden of eden»
There are four tiny patches of vine at Scotchman's Hill, which have been mollycoddled by Robin Brockett, since the start of his tenure as chief winemaker in the 1980s. Excruciatingly limited after a strict pruning and rigorous sorting of fruit, they each yield a mere hundred cases of wine. Brockett has set aside the precious harvests of these superior blocks for his own label, a personal project to hand craft the finest of vintage, an exclusive range of the Bellarine's most elite single vineyard efforts. So besotted is Brockett by the spectacular quality of fruit from these four regal parcels, he has imported two 800 Litre Tuscan vinification Amphora from the.. Brockett begets the best of bellarine»
Much of the prized harvests from the Hugo family property are destined for Australia's most esteemed brands, the best parcels however, are reserved and released under the Hugo label. Consistency of quality from vintage to vintage is the objective, making wine from the pick of estate grown fruit makes it a reality. A precious component of low cropped, dry grown old vines fruit, greatly enhances the depth of flavour and overall complexity. A Shiraz of opulence and finesse, opaque and textural, in the style of McLaren Vale's most outstanding vintages, Gold Medals Winner Royal Adelaide & Australian Small Winemakers Show, have your Hugo alongside standing rib, at a.. Headline harvests of hugo»

Kaesler Old Bastard Shiraz CONFIRM VINTAGE

Shiraz Barossa South Australia
A single vineyard Shiraz from fruit grown to the estate's 1893 block, hand pruned and hand picked, yielding less than two tonne per acre. When Kaesler first purchased the property, it was in a derelict state and certain to die if measures to revive the site were not expedited. Many years of over cropping and neglect had taken its toll. A previous regime of irrigation with increasingly salty bore water was slowly poisoning the soil. A thousand kilos of Old Bastard's fruit gives about 680 litres of wine or about 900 bottles, single vineyard expression at its most extreme.
Each
$180.99
Dozen
$2171.00
The Kaesler family sprung from Silesian pioneers who migrated to the Barossa in the 1840s. The ancient vines on the 1893 block have deep roots, permitting a greater uptake of minerals, heightening the complexity of the Old Bastard. A greener farming approach has yielded a wine which is enormously hard to interpret when young. A French technique known as eleve-en-chene is employed throughout the vinification, assisting the skilled vignerons who are at a loss to explain what they can't see and don't understand. Old Bastard is matured in the Kaesler's underground cellar for eighteen months in a selection of choice Burgundian oak barrels, bottled a la natural, without any fining or filtration.
Deep red colour. Bright and welcoming nose, an eye of fruit that's hard to unwind, a bowl of red fruits, ink with a streak of fresh rhubarb, oak leaves a scent of Arabic spice market. Bright structured acid, soft milk chocolate, a nice glow of fruits emerge, pomegranate and rhubarb prevail. The finish is of superfine talcum textured fruit and oak tannins.
Kaesler
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