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Some precious old blocks of ancient vine Grenache still remain after a government sponsored program to cull unproductive vineyards during the 1980s. Yielding excruciatingly small harvests of the most characterful fruit, these wizzened old veterans deliver small batch vintages which are evocative of the old world classics from Cotes du Rhone. The enduring Wirra Wirra were established 1894, their eclectic range belies the splendour of small parcels which are separately handled and bottled for exclusive release. The Absconder draws fruit from vines planted a century ago, it merits a breathing and decant, an articulation about the sublime excellence of old vine Australian Grenache... The compelling case for old vines grenache»
Halls Gap Vineyard was planted 1969, along the steep eastern slopes and parched rocky crags of Grampians Ranges, at the very beginning of a renaissance in Victorian viticulture. Since early establishment in the 1860s by the noble Houses of Seppelt and Bests, the region had earned the most elite peerage, a provenance of extraordinary red wines, bursting with bramble opulence and lined with limousin tannins. The Halls Gap property had long been respected as a venerable supplier to the nation's most illustrious brands. Seppelt and Penfolds called on harvests from Halls Gap for their finest vintages. Until 1996, when it was acquired by the late, great Trevor Mast, who was very pleased to bottle Hall Gap's.. Land of the fallen giants»
Right around the time that Frank Potts was planting his nascent Bleasdale Vineyards during the 1850s, an eccentric Prussian named Herman Daenke established a homestead along the banks of Bremer River, which he called Metala. The site was planted to viticulture by Arthur Formby in 1891 and became one of Langhorne Creek's most productive vineyards, it continues to supply fruit for a number of prestigious national brands. Legendary winemaker Brian Dolan took the radical step of bottling Metala under its own label in 1959 and won the inaugural Jimmy Watson Trophy in 1962. Two generations later, the brothers Tom and Guy Adams took a similar leap of faith and branded their Metala fruit as Brothers In Arms... The goodly farms of brothers in arms»

Claymore Dark Side Of The Moon Shiraz CONFIRM VINTAGE

Shiraz Clare Valley South Australia
This one tastes as good as it sounds, a full flavoured, elegantly structured Shiraz, hand crafted from a superior harvest of Clare Valley fruit, much of it grown to a seventy year old Terra rossa site. Despite it's sobering moniker, a stylish and refined Shiraz, full bodied, voluptuous and richly proportioned, layered with Clare complexity. Dak Side will delight Shiraz enthusiasts, its fragrant perfumes and polished structure are a match to fine cuisine, caramelized foie gras or escalope de veau.
Available by the dozen
Case of 12
$269.00
Physicians become great winemakers, they are innately attuned to the biology and alchemy required for constructing the sanest wines. Dark Side of the Moon is crafted from parcels of exceptional Clare Valley Shiraz, displaying great concentration and depth of flavour. Claymore's estate vineyard is non-irrigated with low yields averaging 1½ to 2 tonnes per acre, keeping production at this boutique winery to a modest few thousand cases. Grapes are sourced from sites at Leasingham, Watervale and Penwortham, with contributions from eminent growers in other parts of Valley Clare. The finished Dark Side Shiraz is treated to an extended maturation in seasoned and new French and American oak barrels.
Dark, bright purple colour. Pretty aromatics of crushed violets, dark berries and anise, underlaid by complexing oak derived notes of spices and toast. A gentler acid structure on the palate where juicy berries and dark plum fruits shine alongside mocha notes. Tannins are moderate, gently coating the palate, oak is integrated, to complement rather than overshadow the fruit.
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